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The Puck Is on the Ice:

Impeachment

by Chuck Missler

Well, right on schedule last week House Resolution 304 was introduced by Congressman Bob Barr of Georgia, with 17 cosponsors, to initiate the impeachment process of President Clinton, using precisely the same procedure that was used against Richard Nixon in October of 1973.

The resolution is short and to the point:

"Whereas considerable evidence has been developed from a broad array of credible sources that William Jefferson Clinton, President of the United States, has engaged in a systemic effort to obstruct, undermine, and compromise the legitimate and proper functions and processes of the executive branch: Now, therefore, be it:

"Resolved, That the Committee on the Judiciary is directed to investigate and report to the House whether grounds exist to impeach William Jefferson Clinton, President of the United States. Upon completion of such investigation, that committee shall report to the House its recommendations with respect thereto, including, if the Committee so determines, a resolution of impeachment."

This resolution has been sent to the House Rules Committee. If it is passed by a simple majority in the entire House, the matter will go to the House Judiciary, which will hold hearings to determine if grounds exist for impeachment.

If the House finally decides this is the case, then the matter goes to the Senate, 1 where the impeachment itself is presided over by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

Impeachment is a political issue, not criminal nor civil. Impeachment was designed to halt usurpation or presumptive uses of power, regardless of whether they were statutory or nonstatutory offenses.

In this case, there appears to be a widespread belief that treason, bribery, and obstruction of justice may be involved. If two-thirds of the senators believe the evidence proves the impeached official guilty, then the Constitution allows the Senate to remove the individual from office.

The real outcome will, of course, be dependent upon how the voters respond during the next two months-during which Congress is adjourned. Everyone will be watching to see what impact the alternative media, talk shows, etc., will have. But even the mainline media have been running some startling editorials. 2

If you have strong feelings about this issue, you should contact your elected representatives. Don't expect Republican leadership to show any courage or leadership. But they all will respond to pressure. Yours.

Pray about it. Many people are risking their careers in the belief that the future of the Republic is at issue here.

Although it is disturbing to have to face the corruption that has taken hold in our nation, our stewardship of this issue may be the most important legacy we can give our children and grandchildren.

It will take prayerful diligence and a courageous resolve on our part to insure that our voices are heard.

-You can contact Congressman Barr's (7th District, Georgia) office at Congress of the United States, 1130 Longworth House Building, Washington, DC 20515-2931, (202) 225-2931. His Fax is (202) 225-2944. His Internet address is www.house.gov/barr/

-To be more fully informed, you may want to subscribe to The Washington Times, 3600 New York Ave. NE, Washington, DC 20002, 1-800-636-3699; or Human Events, 7811 Montrose Rd., Potomac, MD 20854, 1-800-787-7557. (You may also want to ask them for their Special Supplement by Michael Chapman, an excellent summary of the numerous issues involved.) 3

-On the Internet, see www.impeach-clinton.com

Impeachment is also an issue regarding the Judiciary. Sixty-one federal judges or Supreme Court Justices have been investigated for impeachment, of whom 13 have been impeached.

We encourage you to get a copy of Impeachment, a most informative booklet by David Barton (see link below).

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This article was originally published in the
December 1997 Personal Update NewsJournal.

For a FREE 1-Year Subscription, click here.


**NOTES**

  1. The House may only bring charges of impeachment; it cannot prosecute them. (Article I, Section 2, 5.)
  2. See Mark Helprin's scathing review in the Wall Street Journal, October 10, 1997. Also, William Safire in the New York Times, October 21, 1997.
  3. See also Personal UPDATE, July 1997, p.13-16.